Approved Projects

RAINY LAKE FISHERIES CHARITY TRUST SUPPORTS FIRST RESEARCH PROJECT IN 2006

The RLFCT has recently approved funding for 2006 and 2007 to support the following post-graduate research program on Rainy Lake, Ontario:

Title: INVESTIGATIONS IN APPLIED SMALLMOUTH BASS BIOLOGY IN NORTHWESTERN ONTARIO

Principle Investigators:

CrappyDr. Steven Cooke
Assistant Professor of Fish Ecology & Conservation Physiology, Carleton University
Dr. Bruce Tufts
Professor of Fish Physiology, Queen’s University

Project 1: Comparative air exposure in smallmouth and largemouth bass
Project 2: Assessment of smallmouth bass physiology, post-release behaviour and fate in a fall bass tournament
Project 3: 2007 catch and release research
Project 4: Nesting biology and parental care research


RLFCT supports second research project in 2009

The RLFCT approved funding for 2009 and 2010 to support the following post-graduate research program on Rainy Lake, Ontario:

Title: INVESTIGATIONS IN LAKE STURGEON FEEDING ECOLOGY ON RAINY LAKE

Principal Investigator:

Dr. Brian McLaren
Professor, Lakehead University

Project 1: The Influence of lake characteristics on invertebrate community structure in the littoral zone: the importance to lake sturgeon
Project 2: Selection of foragin habitats by lake sturgeon (Honours Thesis)
Project 3: SeaCam assessment for substrate sampling.


RLFCT supports third research project in 2015

The RLFCT approved funding for 2015 and 2016 to support the following research project:

Title: HABITAT AND COMMUNITY DYNAMICS AS DRIVERS OF NORTHERN PIKE GROWTH POTENTIAL

Principal Investigators:

Dr. Michael Rennie
Assistant Professor, Lakehead University
Adjunct Professor, University of Manitoba
Dr. Jim Reist
Senior Research Scientist, Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO)

Project 1: Evaluate temporal stability of northern pike life history charactristics from Rainy Lake.
Project 2: Evaluate northern pike growth and like history among Rainy Lake sub-basins.
Project 3: Frame growth potential of Rainy Lake  northern pike within context of provincial databases (FWIN, BSM) and data from the ELA.
Project 4: Identify key limnological and community dynamics that affect northern pike growth potential.
Project 5: Changes in the early growth and condition of lake trout in response to temporal shifts in prey community dynamics.
Project 6: Precision and bias of estimating the age of lake trout using otoliths and fin rays.